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BBC’s Strictly Come Dancing Christmas special flooded with criticism over Gary Barlow performance

Strictly Come Dancing’s Christmas special aired on the BBC yesterday (December 25).

We won’t say who won in case you’ve not watched it yet, but one star absolutely stole the show with full marks across the board.

Although there was another contestant who definitely didn’t achieve a top score score – despite not competing in the show.

Former Take That singer Gary Barlow took to the stage to perform Paul McCartney’s ‘Wonderful Christmastime’.

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However, people were less than impressed with the star’s efforts.

Some viewers were so worried, they accused the singer of ‘ruining Christmas’, while another went as far as to ask for the star to be ‘banned’ from the telly.

@Darrenmwinter said: “Oh look it’s Gary Barlow and the worst singing ever.”

Another fan in disbelief over the performance, questioned whether Barlow still had the knack for singing.

Craig Kringle (@c_jas) said: “Gary Barlow has become a bad lounge-room singer?”

Another fan Stuart Orr (@StuartOrr1) wrote of the “horror” of having to witness Barlow’s performance.

Other viewers lamented that Barlow was ruining McCartney’s famous Christmas jingle, reports Yorkshire Live.

“Barlow is massacring this song,” said @BumfacePeter.

“Gary Barlow killing it on #Strictly. Like, literally, murdering it,” added Adam Green (@Adam9Green).

“Can I phone the police to report the murder of a song?” asked @DexDDogg.

@JasonReidUK joked: “Whoever gets into government next needs to ban Gary Barlow from the telly.”

@MikeBubbins said: “Dear Gary Barlow, you are many things, but a crooner is not one of them. Sincerely, Anyone with ears.”

@tropicalsocks tweeted: “Gary Barlow #ChristmasRuined.”

Some fans went even further in their dislike for the 50-year-old’s dulcet tones, but those views were deemed too explicit to include in this article.